#BackToSchoolSolutions is a campaign to elevate the best ideas that will help students, teachers, and communities find the care they need while creating long-term support by catalyzing change.

SUBMIT YOUR SOLUTIONS AND STORIES!

As students around the country prepare to return to school in countless different ways, their parents, teachers, and other concerned community members are moving from uncertainty to action - forging creative solutions to care for each other and care for our children. Add your voice to help us source the best solutions with the chance to win prizes, funding, and more!

Join Us!
As you create your own solutions, take time to build your resilience through these recommended Microsteps — small actionable changes that can make a lasting impact on our mental and physical well-being.
FOR PARENTS
Write down the name of one fellow parent to call, text, or FaceTime each day.

Connecting with others who are also dealing with back-to-school stress will help you feel less alone.

FOR TEACHERS
If you're wearing a mask, communicate verbally and with gestures more than you normally would.

Consider drawing a smiley face on the mask, using a clear mask, or even introducing some basic sign language gestures — these actions can help foster positivity and connection even when students can't read your facial expressions.

FOR PARENTS
Start a back-to-school gratitude journal.

If you’re struggling with school-related uncertainty and negativity, set aside just a few minutes each day to write down what’s going well. You’ll put your worries in perspective, and reflecting on what we’re grateful for is linked to a range of physical and mental health benefits.

FOR PARENTS
Write down the name of one fellow parent to call, text, or FaceTime each day.

Connecting with others who are also dealing with back-to-school stress will help you feel less alone.

FOR TEACHERS
If you're wearing a mask, communicate verbally and with gestures more than you normally would.

Consider drawing a smiley face on the mask, using a clear mask, or even introducing some basic sign language gestures — these actions can help foster positivity and connection even when students can't read your facial expressions.

FOR PARENTS
Start a back-to-school gratitude journal.

If you’re struggling with school-related uncertainty and negativity, set aside just a few minutes each day to write down what’s going well. You’ll put your worries in perspective, and reflecting on what we’re grateful for is linked to a range of physical and mental health benefits.

FOR TEACHERS
Whether virtually or in person, create clear classroom routines.

Each student will have experienced significant disruptions in their day-to-day routines the last several months in very different ways, and consistency is key for feeling safe and enabling learning.

FOR PARENTS
Schedule time each day to check in with your child.

In ordinary times, going back to school can be a time of anxiety among children — and right now there are even more factors to cause worry. Even if they’re not in the mood to share, a brief daily check-in will keep the lines of communication open.

FOR TEACHERS
Set aside a few minutes each night to write in a well-being journal.

The longer our work routines are disrupted, the more likely we are to slip back into poor habits and neglect our well-being. Jotting down notes on your sleep, nutrition, and movement patterns will help you celebrate your successes and pinpoint better choices.

FOR PARENTS
Get your family back on a regular sleep schedule.

Many parents and families have adopted new sleep schedules during the pandemic — often going to bed later. Start moving up bedtime incrementally to ease your child’s transition — and your own. Even a few minutes per night will make a difference.

FOR TEACHERS
Once a day, remind yourself to remain open to change.

As uncertainty about schooling continues, being open to change helps decrease frustration associated with ambiguity. Science shows regularly reminding ourselves that change is a good thing can actually retrain our brains to handle it better.

FOR PARENTS
Choose one calming habit to role model each day for your child.

Children often take their emotional cues from parents. Spend just a few minutes on an activity that brings you calm — it might be meditation, breathing, stretching, or something else — for your own benefit, and your child’s.

FOR TEACHERS
When you're feeling stressed, remind yourself why you became a teacher in the first place.

Remembering what motivated you to join this field can help you to move through challenging moments with more resilience.

Community Solutions
Nemours Children's Health System

How to Wear a Face Mask at School

Social Media Toolkit

#BackToSchoolSolutions is a call to engage. If we want to help the next generation succeed, we all need to step up. Join us! So much is possible when we come together.

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Back to School News
What's Working: Solutions Worth Celebrating
Best of Social Media
Resources
Tips for a safe return to school
[Valley Medical Group’s Department of Children’s Services] A helpful list of information and guidance to help ease concerns surrounding a safe return to school for the child/children in your life — whether it be a daughter, son, niece, nephew, or grandchild.
Family and Teacher Center
[Wide Open School] Find tips and resources for distance learning for parents/caregivers and teachers.
Working Parents Support Guide
[LegUp] A practical guide for companies to support working parents & caregivers in a pandemic.
Toolkit and Educator Help Desk
[Learning Keeps Going] To support educators and parents during extended school closures, ISTE and EdSurge have curated a list of free tools and resources as well as an Educator Help Desk where experts will answer your online learning questions.
Student Voice Learning Lab
[Student Voice] Through conversations with experienced student leaders and industry professionals, the Learning Lab connects you with critical information that dictates the process of movement building, including networking, storytelling, facilitating and much more. Join the District Direct Action Leadership Training to learn the ins and outs of school boards, school districts and how to advocate for local change in your school system.
America’s Promise Alliance COVID-19 Resources
[America’s Promise Alliance] Members of America’s Promise Alliance and their networks have developed and compiled a wide range of resources to help educators, out-of-school-time providers, parents and families, and community leaders support their young people during this unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic.
How to Teach Social-Emotional Learning When Students Aren't in School
[Education Week] EdWeek's expert-curated recommendations about what SEL skills, exactly, schools should be encouraging and how teachers can do it.
Special Report: Taking Care of Teachers
[Education Week] A special report that looks at the many ways stressors related to COVID-19 and racial inequities have affected the teacher workforce, strategies for self-care, and how school leaders and districts can help protect their teachers’ social and emotional well-being through the continued uncertainty.
Back-to-School Resources for Families and Educators
[Child Mind Institute] No matter your situation, Child Mind Institute offers practical tools, tip sheets, and expert advice to help you make the best of going back to school during the coronavirus crisis.
Virtual Education and Students with Disabilities Resource Guide
[Respectability] Whether you are a student with a disability or an adult (parent, guardian, teacher or otherwise) who is championing success for a student with a disability, this guide is for you. This guide includes resources that can help pave the best educational and social-emotional path possible during this pandemic
Modern Village
[Modern Village] Join a community that is lightening the parenting load by making it visible in one central place, using technology to make it more efficient, and making it easy to collaborate with all the people in the mix, without needing one person to manage it all.
Back to School Suggestions for Parents of Children with Special Needs
[NY Times] Mark Bertin, a developmental pediatrician, came up with a list of suggestions for parents to help their children with special needs get through the school year.
Social Emotional Learning Roadmap for Reopening School
[CASEL] The SEL Roadmap is designed to support school leaders and leadership teams in planning for the transition back to schools, in whatever form that takes. Schools at any stage of SEL implementation can use this roadmap to build upon existing efforts around community-building, school climate improvement, student well-being and mental health, trauma-responsive learning environments, restorative practices, and social and emotional competency development.
How to Handle Anxiety Over Back-to-School Decisions
[NY Times] While parents may be feeling unsure about school options this fall, there are ways to feel better as you make the tough decision.
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